Meet the key people behind the EclairColor HDR technology

Jean Mizrahi

Jean Mizrahi

Founder, President and CEO Ymagis Group

Christophe Lacroix

Christophe Lacroix

Christophe Lacroix Senior Vice President New Projects, Ymagis Group

Cédric Lejeune

Cédric Lejeune

VP of Innovation and Technology Eclair

Thierry Beaumel

Thierry Beaumel

Director of Image Postproduction Eclair

Till Cussmann

Till Cussmann

SVP CinemaNext

Maxime Rigaud

Maxime Rigaud

Managing Director CinemaNext France, Switzerland and Africa

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Behind the scenes

Can you describe EclairColor in a few words?
  • Jean Mizrahi

    EclairColor is a new digital color technology that combines an innovative post-production process with the optimization of select projection system technologies readily available on the market. This means the image is remastered in post-production to obtain more color and contrast and therefore a more detailed end-result. At the same time, EclairColor projectors are being installed in auditoriums to provide audiences with an enhanced experience.

What are the advantages for audiences in seeing a film in EclairColor?
  • Cédric Lejeune

    An EclairColor film features much more contrast. The resulting depth draws the viewer into the image. For example, in a normal auditorium with a standard projector, the difference between the lightest and the darkest points (white and black) is a ratio of approximately 1,500 to 1. With EclairColor that ratio is over 7,000 –generally between 8,000 and 9,000. The color depth is therefore far greater.

    Jean Mizrahi

    With EclairColor we achieve light that is closer to real light, the light the eye perceives in everyday life. When you compare EclairColor and current standard projection, it’s as though a veil has been lifted from the image to restore real light. It is even more striking in scenes shot in the daylight. In an EclairColor film, you have much more subtle shades in both the dark and very light colors. Ultimately, this provides a far richer color and light spectrum with a greater sense of depth than in standard image projection.

    Till Cussmann

    This is a first step towards improving projection quality in cinemas serving a much wider public and clientele than all other initiatives we’ve seen to date, which were reserved for very select VIP auditoriums with extremely expensive equipment. EclairColor allows everyone the opportunity to enjoy a sharper, more contrasted image, exactly as can be seen today in the world of television. With EclairColor, we are now bringing this into theatres.

    Thierry Beaumel

    The EclairColor process is a form of HDR. To project EclairColor mastered films we use a projector with a range of contrasts, or in other words a dynamic range, at least four times greater than a standard projector. This range produces much more luminous whites. Compared to standard projection, you can achieve roughly twice the luminosity. With whites that are twice as white, we also get blacks that are twice as black or even more. So, the result is more light, more contrast and visually more definition and color in all the highlights. To summarize, with EclairColor, you realize that all the images you have seen, practically from the outset, have a sort of white filter on them that limits the amount of information and color in the highlights. It’s as though the white filter visible on all our cinema screens has suddenly been removed.

    Maxime Rigaud

    EclairColor provides a very colorful, deep, contrasted image. For example, the blue of the ocean is exceptional. It’s a blue the like of which has never been seen in the cinema before! All the vibrancy of the image is restored and the experience is incomparable.

Can you describe EclairColor in a few words?
  • Jean Mizrahi

    EclairColor is a new digital color technology that combines an innovative post-production process with the optimization of select projection system technologies readily available on the market. This means the image is remastered in post-production to obtain more color and contrast and therefore a more detailed end-result. At the same time, EclairColor projectors are being installed in auditoriums to provide audiences with an enhanced experience.

What are the advantages for audiences in seeing a film in EclairColor?
  • Cédric Lejeune

    An EclairColor film features much more contrast. The resulting depth draws the viewer into the image. For example, in a normal auditorium with a standard projector, the difference between the lightest and the darkest points (white and black) is a ratio of approximately 1,500 to 1. With EclairColor that ratio is over 7,000 –generally between 8,000 and 9,000. The color depth is therefore far greater.

    Jean Mizrahi

    With EclairColor we achieve light that is closer to real light, the light the eye perceives in everyday life. When you compare EclairColor and current standard projection, it’s as though a veil has been lifted from the image to restore real light. It is even more striking in scenes shot in the daylight. In an EclairColor film, you have much more subtle shades in both the dark and very light colors. Ultimately, this provides a far richer color and light spectrum with a greater sense of depth than in standard image projection.

    Till Cussmann

    This is a first step towards improving projection quality in cinemas serving a much wider public and clientele than all other initiatives we’ve seen to date, which were reserved for very select VIP auditoriums with extremely expensive equipment. EclairColor allows everyone the opportunity to enjoy a sharper, more contrasted image, exactly as can be seen today in the world of television. With EclairColor, we are now bringing this into theatres.

    Thierry Beaumel

    The EclairColor process is a form of HDR. To project EclairColor mastered films we use a projector with a range of contrasts, or in other words a dynamic range, at least four times greater than a standard projector. This range produces much more luminous whites. Compared to standard projection, you can achieve roughly twice the luminosity. With whites that are twice as white, we also get blacks that are twice as black or even more. So, the result is more light, more contrast and visually more definition and color in all the highlights. To summarize, with EclairColor, you realize that all the images you have seen, practically from the outset, have a sort of white filter on them that limits the amount of information and color in the highlights. It’s as though the white filter visible on all our cinema screens has suddenly been removed.

    Maxime Rigaud

    EclairColor provides a very colorful, deep, contrasted image. For example, the blue of the ocean is exceptional. It’s a blue the like of which has never been seen in the cinema before! All the vibrancy of the image is restored and the experience is incomparable.

How does EclairColor work in the production chain?
  • Thierry Beaumel

    First and foremost, it brings a certain form of freedom. It opens up a world of possibilities from a grading standpoint. It is as though we had been grading in a 10m2 room and have moved to a 100m2 loft with EclairColor. We have more room to store our things, we are more comfortable and we have more breathing space. It is therefore easier to choose one color from among all the others when grading. There is better color separation, so our grading work can be more finely-tuned. There is a real improvement in the quality of the image expert.

What are the advantages for audiences in seeing a film in EclairColor?
  • Cédric Lejeune

    An EclairColor film features much more contrast. The resulting depth draws the viewer into the image. For example, in a normal auditorium with a standard projector, the difference between the lightest and the darkest points (white and black) is a ratio of approximately 1,500 to 1. With EclairColor that ratio is over 7,000 –generally between 8,000 and 9,000. The color depth is therefore far greater.

    Jean Mizrahi

    With EclairColor we achieve light that is closer to real light, the light the eye perceives in everyday life. When you compare EclairColor and current standard projection, it’s as though a veil has been lifted from the image to restore real light. It is even more striking in scenes shot in the daylight. In an EclairColor film, you have much more subtle shades in both the dark and very light colors. Ultimately, this provides a far richer color and light spectrum with a greater sense of depth than in standard image projection.

    Till Cussmann

    This is a first step towards improving projection quality in cinemas serving a much wider public and clientele than all other initiatives we’ve seen to date, which were reserved for very select VIP auditoriums with extremely expensive equipment. EclairColor allows everyone the opportunity to enjoy a sharper, more contrasted image, exactly as can be seen today in the world of television. With EclairColor, we are now bringing this into theatres.

    Thierry Beaumel

    The EclairColor process is a form of HDR. To project EclairColor mastered films we use a projector with a range of contrasts, or in other words a dynamic range, at least four times greater than a standard projector. This range produces much more luminous whites. Compared to standard projection, you can achieve roughly twice the luminosity. With whites that are twice as white, we also get blacks that are twice as black or even more. So, the result is more light, more contrast and visually more definition and color in all the highlights. To summarize, with EclairColor, you realize that all the images you have seen, practically from the outset, have a sort of white filter on them that limits the amount of information and color in the highlights. It’s as though the white filter visible on all our cinema screens has suddenly been removed.

    Maxime Rigaud

    EclairColor provides a very colorful, deep, contrasted image. For example, the blue of the ocean is exceptional. It’s a blue the like of which has never been seen in the cinema before! All the vibrancy of the image is restored and the experience is incomparable.

How does EclairColor work in the production chain?
  • Thierry Beaumel

    First and foremost, it brings a certain form of freedom. It opens up a world of possibilities from a grading standpoint. It is as though we had been grading in a 10m2 room and have moved to a 100m2 loft with EclairColor. We have more room to store our things, we are more comfortable and we have more breathing space. It is therefore easier to choose one color from among all the others when grading. There is better color separation, so our grading work can be more finely-tuned. There is a real improvement in the quality of the image expert.

What are the benefits for exhibitors?
  • Cédric Lejeune

    EclairColor provides superior image quality that is apparent to all. The format involves very strict quality standards, which gives us excellent control of the projected image. Thanks to this constant monitoring system, we can deliver on our promise to a film’s director or director of photography that the film seen by the moviegoer will reflect what they originally intended. EclairColor guarantees that the artistic intent is respected.

    Till Cussmann

    Without investing exorbitant sums, cinema exhibitors can offer their customers a visual experience that is much closer to reality and vastly different from what is currently seen on the big screen. The images are truer to life with more detail than a normal projection. It is a quality, immersive experience for viewers, who will feel closer to reality.

    Maxime Rigaud

    For exhibitors, the goal is to provide their audiences with a higher quality image. As a result, viewers will feel totally immersed in the film. The EclairColor image provides more information, more color, more depth of field and is more vibrant. It is a very photographic, visual, cinema-quality image. Whatever the film, the audience will experience more intense emotions in the theatre. This has proved true for both arthouse films, such as Aquarius, and films aimed more at the general audience such as Brice 3. The feeling is the same.

How does EclairColor work in the production chain?
  • Thierry Beaumel

    First and foremost, it brings a certain form of freedom. It opens up a world of possibilities from a grading standpoint. It is as though we had been grading in a 10m2 room and have moved to a 100m2 loft with EclairColor. We have more room to store our things, we are more comfortable and we have more breathing space. It is therefore easier to choose one color from among all the others when grading. There is better color separation, so our grading work can be more finely-tuned. There is a real improvement in the quality of the image expert.

What are the benefits for exhibitors?
  • Cédric Lejeune

    EclairColor provides superior image quality that is apparent to all. The format involves very strict quality standards, which gives us excellent control of the projected image. Thanks to this constant monitoring system, we can deliver on our promise to a film’s director or director of photography that the film seen by the moviegoer will reflect what they originally intended. EclairColor guarantees that the artistic intent is respected.

    Till Cussmann

    Without investing exorbitant sums, cinema exhibitors can offer their customers a visual experience that is much closer to reality and vastly different from what is currently seen on the big screen. The images are truer to life with more detail than a normal projection. It is a quality, immersive experience for viewers, who will feel closer to reality.

    Maxime Rigaud

    For exhibitors, the goal is to provide their audiences with a higher quality image. As a result, viewers will feel totally immersed in the film. The EclairColor image provides more information, more color, more depth of field and is more vibrant. It is a very photographic, visual, cinema-quality image. Whatever the film, the audience will experience more intense emotions in the theatre. This has proved true for both arthouse films, such as Aquarius, and films aimed more at the general audience such as Brice 3. The feeling is the same.

Is the cinema standard of tomorrow inevitably HDR?
  • Jean Mizrahi

    The future of cinema is HDR. There is no doubt about that because the television of today and tomorrow is HDR and once viewers are used to HDR, they will not accept anything less from the cinema experience.

    Christophe Lacroix

    Our aim is to create a standard that will gradually become a universal standard. Beyond this, the auditorium of the future will be a sensory experience that is as close as possible to reality. It must offer audiences an image closer to reality, which means a wider color range and higher frame rate – a rate of 60 frames per second, for example.

What are the benefits for exhibitors?
  • Cédric Lejeune

    EclairColor provides superior image quality that is apparent to all. The format involves very strict quality standards, which gives us excellent control of the projected image. Thanks to this constant monitoring system, we can deliver on our promise to a film’s director or director of photography that the film seen by the moviegoer will reflect what they originally intended. EclairColor guarantees that the artistic intent is respected.

    Till Cussmann

    Without investing exorbitant sums, cinema exhibitors can offer their customers a visual experience that is much closer to reality and vastly different from what is currently seen on the big screen. The images are truer to life with more detail than a normal projection. It is a quality, immersive experience for viewers, who will feel closer to reality.

    Maxime Rigaud

    For exhibitors, the goal is to provide their audiences with a higher quality image. As a result, viewers will feel totally immersed in the film. The EclairColor image provides more information, more color, more depth of field and is more vibrant. It is a very photographic, visual, cinema-quality image. Whatever the film, the audience will experience more intense emotions in the theatre. This has proved true for both arthouse films, such as Aquarius, and films aimed more at the general audience such as Brice 3. The feeling is the same.

Can you tell us how the project began?
  • Jean Mizrahi

    We had been looking at HDR - High Dynamic Range - for several months. We noticed there was a pronounced shift toward HDR in both television and video. Technological advances have enabled television delivery systems to incorporate HDR. Companies such as Netflix and Amazon are trying to appeal to a clientele that has higher expectations when it comes to picture quality. Then other international players such as Canal+ entered the fray. When we saw, that television was heading in this new direction, we looked more closely at the possibility of using HDR in a cinema setting, with an eye to creating a picture format that would enhance the cinema experience. Our goal was to introduce HDR to the film world without compromising the exceptional quality of the image which is the hallmark of cinematography. Last spring, after conducting numerous tests, we came up with a solution that appeared to be economically feasible. For a cost that is fairly close to what current technology can provide to movie theatres, we can offer a picture quality that is far superior as it is in HDR.

    Cédric Lejeune

    We first started to work on EclairColor in 2015 with the aim of improving image quality. With Eclair’s significant expertise in what is known as HDR, our teams already had an excellent grasp of the issues, and I myself had 10 years of expertise in color management when we began working on this project. By May 2015, we had a working prototype. A dozen or so people worked on the core of the project, which required close collaboration between the teams at Eclair and CinemaNext.

    Jean Mizrahi

    We also worked in close partnership with Sony Digital Cinema 4K, as Sony’s projection technology appeared to us as the best suited to our approach. We conducted tests, which led us to remaster a number of short films to assess the results. We first presented the technology at the CineEurope convention in Barcelona in June 2016. It was the first time we had shown the result of our work to any third party. The industry feedback was so positive that we decided to step up the pace so we could bring it to the market in September 2016. It took just 18 months from initial conception to the launch of EclairColor.

Is the cinema standard of tomorrow inevitably HDR?
  • Jean Mizrahi

    The future of cinema is HDR. There is no doubt about that because the television of today and tomorrow is HDR and once viewers are used to HDR, they will not accept anything less from the cinema experience.

    Christophe Lacroix

    Our aim is to create a standard that will gradually become a universal standard. Beyond this, the auditorium of the future will be a sensory experience that is as close as possible to reality. It must offer audiences an image closer to reality, which means a wider color range and higher frame rate – a rate of 60 frames per second, for example.

Can you tell us how the project began?
  • Jean Mizrahi

    We had been looking at HDR - High Dynamic Range - for several months. We noticed there was a pronounced shift toward HDR in both television and video. Technological advances have enabled television delivery systems to incorporate HDR. Companies such as Netflix and Amazon are trying to appeal to a clientele that has higher expectations when it comes to picture quality. Then other international players such as Canal+ entered the fray. When we saw, that television was heading in this new direction, we looked more closely at the possibility of using HDR in a cinema setting, with an eye to creating a picture format that would enhance the cinema experience. Our goal was to introduce HDR to the film world without compromising the exceptional quality of the image which is the hallmark of cinematography. Last spring, after conducting numerous tests, we came up with a solution that appeared to be economically feasible. For a cost that is fairly close to what current technology can provide to movie theatres, we can offer a picture quality that is far superior as it is in HDR.

    Cédric Lejeune

    We first started to work on EclairColor in 2015 with the aim of improving image quality. With Eclair’s significant expertise in what is known as HDR, our teams already had an excellent grasp of the issues, and I myself had 10 years of expertise in color management when we began working on this project. By May 2015, we had a working prototype. A dozen or so people worked on the core of the project, which required close collaboration between the teams at Eclair and CinemaNext.

    Jean Mizrahi

    We also worked in close partnership with Sony Digital Cinema 4K, as Sony’s projection technology appeared to us as the best suited to our approach. We conducted tests, which led us to remaster a number of short films to assess the results. We first presented the technology at the CineEurope convention in Barcelona in June 2016. It was the first time we had shown the result of our work to any third party. The industry feedback was so positive that we decided to step up the pace so we could bring it to the market in September 2016. It took just 18 months from initial conception to the launch of EclairColor.

Is the cinema standard of tomorrow inevitably HDR?
  • Jean Mizrahi

    The future of cinema is HDR. There is no doubt about that because the television of today and tomorrow is HDR and once viewers are used to HDR, they will not accept anything less from the cinema experience.

    Christophe Lacroix

    Our aim is to create a standard that will gradually become a universal standard. Beyond this, the auditorium of the future will be a sensory experience that is as close as possible to reality. It must offer audiences an image closer to reality, which means a wider color range and higher frame rate – a rate of 60 frames per second, for example.

Can you tell us how the project began?
  • Jean Mizrahi

    We had been looking at HDR - High Dynamic Range - for several months. We noticed there was a pronounced shift toward HDR in both television and video. Technological advances have enabled television delivery systems to incorporate HDR. Companies such as Netflix and Amazon are trying to appeal to a clientele that has higher expectations when it comes to picture quality. Then other international players such as Canal+ entered the fray. When we saw, that television was heading in this new direction, we looked more closely at the possibility of using HDR in a cinema setting, with an eye to creating a picture format that would enhance the cinema experience. Our goal was to introduce HDR to the film world without compromising the exceptional quality of the image which is the hallmark of cinematography. Last spring, after conducting numerous tests, we came up with a solution that appeared to be economically feasible. For a cost that is fairly close to what current technology can provide to movie theatres, we can offer a picture quality that is far superior as it is in HDR.

    Cédric Lejeune

    We first started to work on EclairColor in 2015 with the aim of improving image quality. With Eclair’s significant expertise in what is known as HDR, our teams already had an excellent grasp of the issues, and I myself had 10 years of expertise in color management when we began working on this project. By May 2015, we had a working prototype. A dozen or so people worked on the core of the project, which required close collaboration between the teams at Eclair and CinemaNext.

    Jean Mizrahi

    We also worked in close partnership with Sony Digital Cinema 4K, as Sony’s projection technology appeared to us as the best suited to our approach. We conducted tests, which led us to remaster a number of short films to assess the results. We first presented the technology at the CineEurope convention in Barcelona in June 2016. It was the first time we had shown the result of our work to any third party. The industry feedback was so positive that we decided to step up the pace so we could bring it to the market in September 2016. It took just 18 months from initial conception to the launch of EclairColor.

The EclairColor process can be used during grading or remastering. What is the difference?
  • Cédric Lejeune

    In short, the difference between the two is that one involves building and the other reworking. In remastering mode, you have to work with what has already been done, whereas in grading mode, it is a question of creation and reflecting more on the content, the director of photography’s work and his or her intentions. The EclairColor workflow is designed such that graders can switch from one master to another on their consoles, allowing them to work on both versions at the same time (standard and EclairColor). The improvement in colorimetry is due in particular to the heightened contrast. We always respect the original intention of the film and work under the artistic control of the client.

    Thierry Beaumel

    During the grading process, we work directly from the camera files. We therefore have much more material to work with at this point. When the process is used at the remastering stage, the starting point is a film that has already been graded so we are dependent to some extent on what is left of the image. Regardless, however, the result remains spectacular.

How long does it take to convert an EclairColor film?
  • Thierry Beaumel

    It takes a total of five days from the time we receive the elements to when we deliver the DCP. This represents a week of grading in fact. And it really is a regrading process, not an automatic conversion using an algorithm.

The EclairColor process can be used during grading or remastering. What is the difference?
  • Cédric Lejeune

    In short, the difference between the two is that one involves building and the other reworking. In remastering mode, you have to work with what has already been done, whereas in grading mode, it is a question of creation and reflecting more on the content, the director of photography’s work and his or her intentions. The EclairColor workflow is designed such that graders can switch from one master to another on their consoles, allowing them to work on both versions at the same time (standard and EclairColor). The improvement in colorimetry is due in particular to the heightened contrast. We always respect the original intention of the film and work under the artistic control of the client.

    Thierry Beaumel

    During the grading process, we work directly from the camera files. We therefore have much more material to work with at this point. When the process is used at the remastering stage, the starting point is a film that has already been graded so we are dependent to some extent on what is left of the image. Regardless, however, the result remains spectacular.

How long does it take to convert an EclairColor film?
  • Thierry Beaumel

    It takes a total of five days from the time we receive the elements to when we deliver the DCP. This represents a week of grading in fact. And it really is a regrading process, not an automatic conversion using an algorithm.

The EclairColor process can be used during grading or remastering. What is the difference?
  • Cédric Lejeune

    In short, the difference between the two is that one involves building and the other reworking. In remastering mode, you have to work with what has already been done, whereas in grading mode, it is a question of creation and reflecting more on the content, the director of photography’s work and his or her intentions. The EclairColor workflow is designed such that graders can switch from one master to another on their consoles, allowing them to work on both versions at the same time (standard and EclairColor). The improvement in colorimetry is due in particular to the heightened contrast. We always respect the original intention of the film and work under the artistic control of the client.

    Thierry Beaumel

    During the grading process, we work directly from the camera files. We therefore have much more material to work with at this point. When the process is used at the remastering stage, the starting point is a film that has already been graded so we are dependent to some extent on what is left of the image. Regardless, however, the result remains spectacular.

How long does it take to convert an EclairColor film?
  • Thierry Beaumel

    It takes a total of five days from the time we receive the elements to when we deliver the DCP. This represents a week of grading in fact. And it really is a regrading process, not an automatic conversion using an algorithm.

Will all cinemas therefore be equipped with EclairColor technology in the future?
  • Jean Mizrahi

    They will have an EclairColor-type format and, obviously, we would like EclairColor to be the market reference. Today it is the only format available to everyone, in that any cinema can purchase it for the price of a standard projector. It is financially feasible. So, a cinema that wishes to renew its equipment or a new build cinema today could switch to an EclairColor offer without any significant additional cost, allowing them to be early adopters of what we are convinced will be the future technology standard.

    Till Cussmann

    There is no doubt that EclairColor will change the cinema experience. For me, though, the overall experience is not simply the result of an improved image. It is a combination of several elements, in particular sound, which is also becoming immersive today. Added to this is something of fundamental importance: comfortable seats as we spend one and a half to two hours sitting in the cinema. The auditorium of tomorrow is a complete experience. An experience that takes the viewer on a voyage while ensuring their comfort.

    Maxime Rigaud

    I think EclairColor has great promise! It is a standard that will endure. I would even go so far as to say that I think it will serve as a catalyst for change in the industry. Technically it is such a striking, visible improvement that enthusiasm for it can only be strong. In my opinion, the technology will speed up the process of fitting out and replacing the equipment in certain cinemas.

So, you can equip all types of auditoriums, from arthouse cinemas to large multiplexes?
  • Cédric Lejeune

    Absolutely. You only need to look at the first two EclairColor films and equipped cinemas. On the one hand, we had the release of Aquarius, a Brazilian arthouse film screened in our first EclairColor cinema, the Etoile Saint-Germain-des-Prés in Paris. On the other hand, we had Brice 3 released in EclairColor at the Gaumont Champs-Elysées, our second EclairColor-equipped cinema. The two couldn’t be more different but that is what is fantastic. EclairColor can be used in all cinemas, all auditoriums and on all films. I believe we have taken a huge step forward with EclairColor. The HDR market is getting a considerable boost.

    EclairColor is the future of cinema today.

Will all cinemas therefore be equipped with EclairColor technology in the future?
  • Jean Mizrahi

    They will have an EclairColor-type format and, obviously, we would like EclairColor to be the market reference. Today it is the only format available to everyone, in that any cinema can purchase it for the price of a standard projector. It is financially feasible. So, a cinema that wishes to renew its equipment or a new build cinema today could switch to an EclairColor offer without any significant additional cost, allowing them to be early adopters of what we are convinced will be the future technology standard.

    Till Cussmann

    There is no doubt that EclairColor will change the cinema experience. For me, though, the overall experience is not simply the result of an improved image. It is a combination of several elements, in particular sound, which is also becoming immersive today. Added to this is something of fundamental importance: comfortable seats as we spend one and a half to two hours sitting in the cinema. The auditorium of tomorrow is a complete experience. An experience that takes the viewer on a voyage while ensuring their comfort.

    Maxime Rigaud

    I think EclairColor has great promise! It is a standard that will endure. I would even go so far as to say that I think it will serve as a catalyst for change in the industry. Technically it is such a striking, visible improvement that enthusiasm for it can only be strong. In my opinion, the technology will speed up the process of fitting out and replacing the equipment in certain cinemas.

So, you can equip all types of auditoriums, from arthouse cinemas to large multiplexes?
  • Cédric Lejeune

    Absolutely. You only need to look at the first two EclairColor films and equipped cinemas. On the one hand, we had the release of Aquarius, a Brazilian arthouse film screened in our first EclairColor cinema, the Etoile Saint-Germain-des-Prés in Paris. On the other hand, we had Brice 3 released in EclairColor at the Gaumont Champs-Elysées, our second EclairColor-equipped cinema. The two couldn’t be more different but that is what is fantastic. EclairColor can be used in all cinemas, all auditoriums and on all films. I believe we have taken a huge step forward with EclairColor. The HDR market is getting a considerable boost.

    EclairColor is the future of cinema today.

Will all cinemas therefore be equipped with EclairColor technology in the future?
  • Jean Mizrahi

    They will have an EclairColor-type format and, obviously, we would like EclairColor to be the market reference. Today it is the only format available to everyone, in that any cinema can purchase it for the price of a standard projector. It is financially feasible. So, a cinema that wishes to renew its equipment or a new build cinema today could switch to an EclairColor offer without any significant additional cost, allowing them to be early adopters of what we are convinced will be the future technology standard.

    Till Cussmann

    There is no doubt that EclairColor will change the cinema experience. For me, though, the overall experience is not simply the result of an improved image. It is a combination of several elements, in particular sound, which is also becoming immersive today. Added to this is something of fundamental importance: comfortable seats as we spend one and a half to two hours sitting in the cinema. The auditorium of tomorrow is a complete experience. An experience that takes the viewer on a voyage while ensuring their comfort.

    Maxime Rigaud

    I think EclairColor has great promise! It is a standard that will endure. I would even go so far as to say that I think it will serve as a catalyst for change in the industry. Technically it is such a striking, visible improvement that enthusiasm for it can only be strong. In my opinion, the technology will speed up the process of fitting out and replacing the equipment in certain cinemas.

So, you can equip all types of auditoriums, from arthouse cinemas to large multiplexes?
  • Cédric Lejeune

    Absolutely. You only need to look at the first two EclairColor films and equipped cinemas. On the one hand, we had the release of Aquarius, a Brazilian arthouse film screened in our first EclairColor cinema, the Etoile Saint-Germain-des-Prés in Paris. On the other hand, we had Brice 3 released in EclairColor at the Gaumont Champs-Elysées, our second EclairColor-equipped cinema. The two couldn’t be more different but that is what is fantastic. EclairColor can be used in all cinemas, all auditoriums and on all films. I believe we have taken a huge step forward with EclairColor. The HDR market is getting a considerable boost.

    EclairColor is the future of cinema today.

Can you describe EclairColor in a few words?
  • Jean Mizrahi

    EclairColor is a new digital color technology that combines an innovative post-production process with the optimization of select projection system technologies readily available on the market. This means the image is remastered in post-production to obtain more color and contrast and therefore a more detailed end-result. At the same time, EclairColor projectors are being installed in auditoriums to provide audiences with an enhanced experience.